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THE NEW PRECIOUS

Quintessentially Pomellato, the incredible diversity and rarity of the colored stones that adorn each jewel is the highest expression of nature.

Amethyst

Part of the quartz family, it can assume a wide range of shades from violet to deep purple thanks to the iron in its composition.

Chalcedony

A variety of the Quartz family with an unusual microcrystalline structure. The stones are usually translucent, often milky or grayish.

Diamond

Diamond is the hardest known natural material. Made entirely from carbon, it boasts a wide range of colors and transparencies that span from colorless to yellowish to yellow, brown, black, blue, green or red, pink, champagne-tan, cognacbrown, lilac (very rare).

Garnet

The latin word granatus, or pomegranate, evokes the shape and color of some garnet crystals. Used since the Bronze Age as a gemstone, it can be found in many colors including red, the most popular and best known, orange, yellow, green, purple, brown and pink.

Lapis

Its name derives from the combination of the Latin word lapis and the Persian word lazhward meaning blue. A deep blue semi-precious stone often with brassy pyrite, it is prized since antiquity for its intense color. Used in Ancient Egypt, by Greeks and Romans, it boasts one of the longest history in jewelry.

Onyx

A variety of chalcedony. Its parallel bands can range from white to almost any color but the best known onyx has black and white bands. Well-known since Ancient History, it was usually cut as a cabochon or into beads and has also been used for intaglio and hardstone cameo engraved gems.

Prasiolite

A variety of quartz in a striking green color that makes it very rare. The word prasiolite means scallion reen-colored stone. It is typically found in volcanic rocks with resistant and durable properties.

Quartz

Quartz is one of the most abundand minerals on Earth. Many different varieties of quartz are semiprecious stones. The rock crystal is colorless and all its varieties are classified according to color of course but also based on their macrocrystalline structure. Amethyst, Rose quartz, Chalcedony, Aventurine, Tiger’s eye, Citrine are just few of the varieties used in jewelry since Ancient Times.

Ruby

Ruby is one of the most precious stones in the Corundum family together with sapphire. A pink to blood-red colored gemstone due to the presence of chromium in its crystal structure. Ruber, from Latin, means red in fact. The quality of a ruby is determined by its color, cut and clarity. The brightest and most valuable red is called blood-red or pigeon blood. The world’s most expensive ruby is the Sunrise Ruby.

Sapphire

It’s typically blue in color, but natural “fancy” sapphires also occur in yellow, purple,orange and green colors. The color of fine blue sapphires may be described as a vivid medium dark violet to purplish blue. Blue sapphire exists in various mixtures of its primary (blue) and secondary hues, various tonal levels (shades) and at various levels of saturation (vividness).

Topaz

Named after the Topasos Island in the Red Sea, this gemstone can be found in a wide range of colors: colorless, white, pale blue, light green, yellow, yellowish brown, or red. The transparent and translucent quality is usually used in jewelry.

Amethyst

Part of the quartz family, it can assume a wide range of shades from violet to deep purple thanks to the iron in its composition.

DISCOVER

Chalcedony

A variety of the Quartz family with an unusual microcrystalline structure. The stones are usually translucent, often milky or grayish.

DISCOVER

Diamond

Diamond is the hardest known natural material. Made entirely from carbon, it boasts a wide range of colors and transparencies that span from colorless to yellowish to yellow, brown, black, blue, green or red, pink, champagne-tan, cognacbrown, lilac (very rare).

DISCOVER

Garnet

The latin word granatus, or pomegranate, evokes the shape and color of some garnet crystals. Used since the Bronze Age as a gemstone, it can be found in many colors including red, the most popular and best known, orange, yellow, green, purple, brown and pink.

DISCOVER

Lapis

Its name derives from the combination of the Latin word lapis and the Persian word lazhward meaning blue. A deep blue semi-precious stone often with brassy pyrite, it is prized since antiquity for its intense color. Used in Ancient Egypt, by Greeks and Romans, it boasts one of the longest history in jewelry.

DISCOVER

Onyx

A variety of chalcedony. Its parallel bands can range from white to almost any color but the best known onyx has black and white bands. Well-known since Ancient History, it was usually cut as a cabochon or into beads and has also been used for intaglio and hardstone cameo engraved gems.

DISCOVER

Prasiolite

A variety of quartz in a striking green color that makes it very rare. The word prasiolite means scallion reen-colored stone. It is typically found in volcanic rocks with resistant and durable properties.

DISCOVER

Quartz

Quartz is one of the most abundand minerals on Earth. Many different varieties of quartz are semiprecious stones. The rock crystal is colorless and all its varieties are classified according to color of course but also based on their macrocrystalline structure. Amethyst, Rose quartz, Chalcedony, Aventurine, Tiger’s eye, Citrine are just few of the varieties used in jewelry since Ancient Times.

DISCOVER

Ruby

Ruby is one of the most precious stones in the Corundum family together with sapphire. A pink to blood-red colored gemstone due to the presence of chromium in its crystal structure. Ruber, from Latin, means red in fact. The quality of a ruby is determined by its color, cut and clarity. The brightest and most valuable red is called blood-red or pigeon blood. The world’s most expensive ruby is the Sunrise Ruby.

DISCOVER

Sapphire

It’s typically blue in color, but natural “fancy” sapphires also occur in yellow, purple,orange and green colors. The color of fine blue sapphires may be described as a vivid medium dark violet to purplish blue. Blue sapphire exists in various mixtures of its primary (blue) and secondary hues, various tonal levels (shades) and at various levels of saturation (vividness).

DISCOVER

Topaz

Named after the Topasos Island in the Red Sea, this gemstone can be found in a wide range of colors: colorless, white, pale blue, light green, yellow, yellowish brown, or red. The transparent and translucent quality is usually used in jewelry.

DISCOVER